Your Italian Travel Tips… Genoa: Look Again! Eye Trickery on the Italian Riviera

Kathryn Occhipinti, MD
Kathryn Occhipinti, MD, for Conversational Italian for Travelers books

Ciao a tutti! Here is another of my favorite blogs with unique travel tips that I would like to share.

About once a month, I will reblog a post about lesser-known sites or places to visit in Italy under the title “Your Italian Travel Tips.” December’s blog post was written by Susan Nelson, travel writer and consultant from Timeless Italy, and her post is unique in that it describes not only cities to explore on the Italian Rivera, but also how to appreciate the unique architecture found there.

Read on to experience a bit of the northwestern Italian coast that encompasses the city of Genoa and many smaller, unique, picturesque villages.

And remember Conversational Italian for Travelers: Just the Important Phrases on Amazon.com and Learn Travel Italian.com if you need a compact, lightweight pocket guidebook to take on your next trip! Free Cultural Notes, Italian Recipes, and Audio to help you practice your Italian are also found on Learn Travel Italian.com.

Timeless Italy Travels

20131103-175553.jpgBeautifully painted facade on a house near Camogli known as ‘trompe l’oeil’ (trick of the eye)

The Italian Riviera is one of my favorite places on earth. Beginning from Genoa and running south along the coastline to Portovenere, small towns along the way are a delight to explore. Camogli, Nervi and Santa Margherita are a few of the exceptional little villages that delight and charm. But they have another unique attraction that is most outstanding. Many of their houses and villas are painted with gorgeous exterior decoration. Caught up in this fascination with illusion, I spent a good amount of time seeking them out.

20131103-175824.jpgPainted on window embellishments on a busy corner in Camogli

While walking through the maze of streets in these villages just this last September, several tall narrow houses caught my eye as being especially ornate. When I looked closer I was stunned to realize that some…

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