Piacere: How Italians Say “I Liked It!”

Rome's via dei Fori Imperiali
Kathryn for learntravelitalian.com
Kathryn Occhipinti, MD, for Learn Travel Italian.com

As we noted in our first blog post on this topic in December 2016, “piacere” is a very important verb for the Italian traveler to know. There are so many people, places, and things “to like” in Italy that we will use this verb often when we are there! 

We have been focusing on the verb piacere again for the new year 2018 in our Conversational Italian! group on Facebook. This time, we have been creating sentences in the past tense, so when we come back from Italy, we will be able to tell our family and friends what we “liked”—speaking in Italian!

At first glance, it may seem difficult for English speakers to use the verb piacere, which literally means “to be pleasing to” when translated into English. But this verb is actually the way Italians express the idea that they like something. Once we tap into the Italian way of thinking and learn a few simple examples, it becomes easy to express how much we have liked things in Italian! Read below to see how this works.  

How many more ways can you think of to use the verb piacere? Please reply. I’d love to hear! Or join our Conversational Italian! group discussion on Facebook.

This material and more on this topic are available in the Conversational Italian for Travelers textbook and reference book, Just the Verbs on amazon.com and Learn Travel Italian.com.

The rights to purchase the Conversational Italian for Travelers books in PDF format on two electronic devices can also be obtained at Learn Travel Italian.com.

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Use the Italian Verb Piacere to Say…

“I Liked It!”

First, let’s review some general information about the verb piacere. Then, we will focus on how to use this verb in the past tense.

As we’ve already mentioned in our first blog post on this topic, the irregular verb piacere literally means to like, as in “to be pleasing to.” Italians use this verb when they want to express the idea that they like something. In English, when we say we like something, we mention two things: what thing is being liked and by whom. So in English, we would say, I like the car and fulfill these two requirements with the subject pronoun “I” and the direct object “car.”

But in Italian, the indirect object is used instead of the direct object, to describe by whom the thing is liked or to whom it is pleasing. If we wanted to change this same English phrase into the Italian way of thinking, we could say, “The car is pleasing to me.” You will hopefully find the mixed Italianized-English phrase “is pleasing to” to be very helpful to understand how piacere really works!

The tricky thing about this type of phrase in Italian is that the conjugation of piacere will have to agree with the number of things that are being liked.

So, if one thing is liked, or an infinitive verb follows, piace is used for the present tense. 

For the past tense, we can use the passato prossimo third person singular forms “è piacuto” and “è piaciuta” for the one-time event when we liked something. The ending of the past participle piaciuto changes, as always for the passato prossimo form, and in this case will depend on whether the thing that is liked is masculine or feminine. If the thing that is liked is masculine, piacuto will keep its “o” ending;  if feminine, then the ending will be changed to an “a” ending to make piaciuta. 

If many things are liked, the third person plural forms “sono piaciuti” for the masculine plural and “sono piaciute” for the feminine plural are used.

Italians then put an indirect object pronoun (mi, ti, Le, le, gli, ci, vi, or gli) before the verb, at the beginning of the sentence, to denote to whom the thing was pleasing.

 

É piaciuto(a)was pleasing to
Use these phrases if one thing was liked before the infinitive verb.

 

Mi è piaciuto il vestito. The dress was pleasing to me. I liked the dress.
Ti è piaciuto il libro. The book was pleasing to you. (fam.) You liked the book.
Le è piaciuta la collana.

Gli/le è piaciuto l’automobile.

The necklace was pleasing to you. (pol.)

The car was pleasing to him/her.

You liked the necklace.

He/she liked the car.

     
Ci è piaciuto il vestito. The dress was pleasing to us. We liked the dress.
Vi è piaciuto i libri. The book was pleasing to you all. You all liked the book.
Gli è piaciuta la collana. The necklace was pleasing to them. They liked the necklace.

 

Sono piaciuti(e)was pleasing to
Use these phrases 
if more than one thing was liked.

 

Mi sono piaciuti i vestiti. The dresses were pleasing to me. I like the dresses.
Ti sono piaciuti i libri. The books were pleasing to you. (fam.) You liked the books.
Le sono piaciute le collane.

Gli/le sono piaciuti gli automobili.

The necklaces were pleasing to you. (pol.)

The cars were pleasing to him/her.

You liked the necklaces.

He/she liked the cars.

     
Ci sono piaciuti i vestiti. The dresses were pleasing to us. We liked the dresses.
Vi sono piaciuti i libri. The books were pleasing to you all. You all liked the books.
Gli sono piaciute le collane. The necklaces were pleasing to them. They liked the necklaces.

For more practice using piacere in the past tense, you might want to try listening to the Conversational Italian for Travelers Chapter 17 interactive audio dialogue “Dinner at the Restaurant.” In our Conversational Italian for Travelers story line, which runs through the 18 chapters of the textbook, the Italian-American girl Caterina goes to visit her Italian family in Italy. They end their time together in Chapters 16–18 with a family dinner at a wonderful restaurant, where they describe to the waiter all the dishes that they have liked.

As always, the more we read, listen, and try to speak about what we have liked, the easier it will be to remember these phrases automatically. Buon divertimento!

 

"Just the Verbs" from Conversational Italian for Travelers books
Conversational Italian for Travelers: Just the Verbs

 

Available on amazon.com and Learn Travel Italian.com.

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Learn Italian Cognates—More Italian/English Best Friends!

Italian Cognates on via Dante, Milan
Kathryn for learntravelitalian.com
Kathryn Occhipinti, MD, for Learn Travel Italian.com

Anyone who has studied Italian for even a short time has probably noticed how similar to English many Italian words are. This is because both languages have words with origins that date back to the Latin language spoken by the Romans. These words are called cognates—words that have a common origin and a similar meaning.

English/Italian cognates can be the best friend of one who is trying to learn either language. But beware! Not all words that sound alike have the same meaning in both languages.  There is a pattern, though, and if you can recognize the different groups of cognates, your vocabulary will greatly increase with very little effort.

For words that are similar in Italian and English, the stem of the word will provide a clue to the actual meaning, and the ending will also follow a common pattern.

See how this works below with an excerpt reprinted from the grammar section of our Conversational Italian for Travelers  textbook, courtesy of publisher Stella Lucente, LLC.

For an easy-to read reference book on grammar, the same section is found in the easy-to-read reference book Conversational Italian for Travelers: Just the Grammar.

 

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Grammar Note: Cognates

Adjectives Ending in -ale, -ico, -etto, -atto

 

 

Here are more examples of cognates—words that have a common origin and a similar meaning in Italian and English. Recognizing these words should greatly increase one’s vocabulary with very little effort!

 

The ending –ale in Italian is equivalent to the ending –al in English. 

originale = original
personale = personal
speciale = special
tradizionale = traditional

 

 

The ending –ico in Italian is equivalent to the ending –ical in English.

classico = classical
fisiologico  = physiological
politico  = political
tecnico = technical
tipico = typical
turistico = touristy

 

The ending –etto in Italian is equivalent to the ending –ect in English. 

corretto = correct
dialetto = dialect
diretto = direct
perfetto = perfect

 

The ending –atto in Italian is equivalent to the ending –act in English.

contatto  = contact (to touch)
   = to know someone (in a business)
contratto = contract
fatto = fact
tratto = tract of land/pamphlet
tratto digestivo = digestive tract

 

 


If you can think of another cognate to add to these lists, please join our Conversational Italian! Facebook group and leave a post, or leave a message below. I’d love to hear from you!

 

Just the Grammar from Conversational Italian for Travelers
Conversational Italian for Travelers: Just the Grammar

Available on Amazon.com and www.Learn Travel Italian.com

Buon Anno Nuovo 2018!

Florence Italy's Ponte Vecchio

To all my friends… May all your Italian dreams come true in 2018!

Auguri di un Felice e Prosperoso

Anno Nuovo!

Best Wishes for a Happy and Prosperous New Year!

Il Primo di Gennaio

Florence, Italy Ponte Vecchio
The Ponte Veccchio, or “Old Bridge,” in Florence, Italy
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I hope you have enjoyed my blog as much as I’ve enjoyed sharing about the Italian language and Italian traditions. Please visit me at this blog in 2018, and invite your friends to join in for more Italian language tips, Italian sayings, and Italian cultural notes.
And remember, this blog is part of our open Facebook page, Conversational Italian!, which is a great place to share about all things Italian. Practice your Italian on this page, ask questions, and share pictures from your trips to Italy.   I’d love to hear from you!
—Kathryn Occhipinti 
It’s never too late to learn Italian or too early to plan your trip to Italy!
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For advanced Italian language materials, Italian cultural notes, and Italian recipes, visit our sister blog at Learn Italian!
Visit our website www.LearnTravelItalian.com, which has FREE Online Interactive Italian Dialogues recorded by native Italian speakers. Follow Caterina on her trip through Italy! Listen to all you need to know about transportation in Italy, making friends, and of course, how to read those Italian menus!
All blogs and Internet materials courtesy of the Conversational Italian for Travelers series of books, available on Amazon.com.
Learn Conversational Italian for Travelers
Conversational Italian for Travelers textbook

Your Italian Travel Tips… Genoa: Look Again! Eye Trickery on the Italian Riviera

Kathryn Occhipinti, MD
Kathryn Occhipinti, MD, for Conversational Italian for Travelers books

Ciao a tutti! Here is another of my favorite blogs with unique travel tips that I would like to share.

About once a month, I will reblog a post about lesser-known sites or places to visit in Italy under the title “Your Italian Travel Tips.” December’s blog post was written by Susan Nelson, travel writer and consultant from Timeless Italy, and her post is unique in that it describes not only cities to explore on the Italian Rivera, but also how to appreciate the unique architecture found there.

Read on to experience a bit of the northwestern Italian coast that encompasses the city of Genoa and many smaller, unique, picturesque villages.

And remember Conversational Italian for Travelers: Just the Important Phrases on Amazon.com and Learn Travel Italian.com if you need a compact, lightweight pocket guidebook to take on your next trip! Free Cultural Notes, Italian Recipes, and Audio to help you practice your Italian are also found on Learn Travel Italian.com.

Timeless Italy Travels

20131103-175553.jpgBeautifully painted facade on a house near Camogli known as ‘trompe l’oeil’ (trick of the eye)

The Italian Riviera is one of my favorite places on earth. Beginning from Genoa and running south along the coastline to Portovenere, small towns along the way are a delight to explore. Camogli, Nervi and Santa Margherita are a few of the exceptional little villages that delight and charm. But they have another unique attraction that is most outstanding. Many of their houses and villas are painted with gorgeous exterior decoration. Caught up in this fascination with illusion, I spent a good amount of time seeking them out.

20131103-175824.jpgPainted on window embellishments on a busy corner in Camogli

While walking through the maze of streets in these villages just this last September, several tall narrow houses caught my eye as being especially ornate. When I looked closer I was stunned to realize that some…

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Buon Natale! Merry Christmas in Italian!

Presepio - Italian Nativity Scene

To all my friends who love all things Italian… Warm wishes for a wonderful holiday!

Buon Natale!

Merry Christmas!

Il 24 di Dicembre

Meaning of Christmas in Italian
The true meaning of Christmas in Italian and English

This special Italian saying for the December holidays was originally posted by Rita from our Conversational Italian! Facebook group. Special thanks to E. L. Word for the Italian photo and Italian language.

We would love to hear what you have to say about your experiences learning Italian and visiting or living in Italy. Join our open Facebook group and share about all things Italian! —Kathryn Occhipinti

Italian Phrases We Use EVERY Day! Christmas season – sounds and scents

Burano in Venice, Italy
Kathryn for learntravelitalian.com
Kathryn Occhipinti, MD, for Learn Travel Italian.com

Christmas-time is still my favorite time of the year. I have to admit that, even as an adult, I still marvel at the sparkle that Christmas lights bring  to my neighborhood in the early evening darkness.  Excitement builds at my home in the beginning of December with the familiar sounds of decorations being hauled out of storage and fixed to their usual places on the fireplace and the stairway.  We listen to our favorite music as we trim the Christmas tree (and try not to argue too much about where each ornament should go). 

And, of course, every Sunday from Thanksgiving until the New Year, smells of the traditional Italian cookies that my mother, children, and I prepare as Christmas treats permeate the household.

So, for this month, I asked the Conversational Italian! Facebook group to describe the sounds and scents of the Christmas season in their households. We will use these examples for our last blog on “commonly used phrases” for this year in order to understand how to use the Italian verb “sentire.”

By the way, we are approaching the end of 2017.  Did you set a goal to speak Italian more easily and confidently by the end of 2017?

As I’ve stressed this year, I believe that “commonly used phrases” are the key for how we can all build fluency in any language in a short time.

If we learn how to incorporate “commonly used phrases” when we speak Italian, we will be able to express ourselves more easily and quickly. We will be on our way to building complex sentences and speaking more like we do in our native language!

This post is the eighth in a series that originates in our Conversational Italian! Facebook group. Our group has had a chance to use these phrases.  Now I am posting them on this blog for everyone to try! 

Two more of our “commonly used phrases” are
 “I hear…” and “I smell…”
 We will discuss the Italian expressions for Christmas season experiences,

leading into
“What I heard…” and “Scents of Christmas…” 

 See below for how this works.

As we all master these phrases, so will you. Try my method and let me know how it works. What sentences will you create with these phrases?

Please reply. I’d love to hear from you! Or join our Conversational Italian! group discussion on Facebook.

This material was adapted from the Conversational Italian for Travelers textbook and reference books  Just the Verbs and Just the Grammar  

                       found on amazon.com and Learn Travel Italian.com.

The rights to purchase the Conversational Italian for Travelers books in PDF format on two electronic devices can also be obtained at Learn Travel Italian.com.

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What I hear… and… What I heard

this Christmas – in Italian

The present tense form for “I hear…” is rendered in Italian with the verb  sentire,  and is, “Io sento…” But, of course, we always leave out the Italian subject pronoun, so the phrase that Italians use is conversation is just, “Sento…” 

(You will notice the similarity of sentire to the verb sentirsi, which means “to feel,” as we’ve discussed in our last two blogs in this series.  But remember, Italian verbs and their reflexive counterparts will have different meanings, despite appearing to have the same stem!)

To complete the phrase, just add what you sound you are listening to after the verb!  This part of the phrase can be a bit tricky, though, because different Italian words are used to describe the various the sounds that we may hear.

For instance, a telephone ring is often described as “uno squillo”  or “lo squillo,” and the verb to use when a telephone is ringing is squillare. 

To describe how a doorbell rings, use the same word that describes how a church bell rings, which is “un suono” or “il suono.” The verb to use is suonare.  Use suonare to describe the act of “playing” an instrument as well. To sing is cantare.

There are several words to describe the concept of noise, but the most common is “rumore.” A loud noise is, of course, “un gran rumore” and noisy is rumoroso.

If we want to ask someone if they can hear the same thing we do, we can simply say, “Puoi sentire?” for  “Can you hear?” More often, though this question is asked and answered in the past tense.  Below are some examples of how to form questions and answers with sentire in the present and the past tense.

(Io) sento… I hear…
(Tu) senti…? Do you hear…?
Puoi sentire? Can you hear?
Hai sentito…? Have you heard…?
Si, ho sentito… Yes, I have heard…
Yes, I heard…
No, non ho sentito… No, I have not heard…
No, I haven’t heard…

Before going on, we should also now revisit an earlier post in this series, Italian Phrases We Use EVERY day! What I saw… and build upon the phrases we learned in that post to make new phrases about what I heard.

Just like a common reply to “What did you see?” is,  “I saw him/her/it,” a common reply to “What did you hear?” is, “I heard him/her/it.” So, we can just substitute the past tense ho sentito(a,i,e) for the past tense in our previous examples about what we saw.

We have built upon what we already know and have easily added more phrases we can use in Italian conversation!

(If you need a grammar refresher on how to describe “it” in Italian, please visit our previous blog or, for even more detail, our Conversational Italian for Travelers Just the Grammar reference book.)  

 

Ho sentito… I heard/I have heard…  
Hai sentito…? Did you hear/Have you heard…?  
     
L’ho sentito. I heard him. I heard it.
L’ha sentita. I heard her. I heard it.
Li ho sentiti. I heard them. (all male or male+female group)  
Le ho sentite. I heard them. (all female group)  

 

Finally, it is difficult to talk about what we hear without mentioning that we are also listening.  After all, it is very important to listen to what we hear!   In order to describe that we are listening in Italian, we must use the verb ascoltare. 

The present tense endings in the first and second person that we are focusing on will be the same as for sentire, and the past tense will also use either ho or hai with the past participle ascoltato.  See the summary chart below for how this works.

(Io) ascolto… I listen…
(Tu) ascolti…? Do you listen…?
Puoi ascoltare? Can you listen?
Hai ascoltato…? Have you listened…?
Si, ho ascoltato… Yes, I have listened…
Yes, I listened…
No, non ho ascoltato… No, I have not ascoltato…
No, I haven’t listened…

 

Now, let’s put  together all of our knowledge of the Italian verbs and phrases that it takes to experience the sounds in our world. We  had fun in our Conversational Italian! group  describing some of the sounds of Christmas.  Below are some examples.  I’ve included both present and past tense phrases. How many more can you think of?

Sento lo squillo del telefono. È nonnna, che vuole invitarci a casa sua.
I hear the telephone ring. It is Grandma, who wants to invite us to her house.Lo sento.
I hear it.
Sento il suono della campanella d’ingresso quando gli ospiti arrivano.
I hear the doorbell ring when the guests arrive.La sento.
I hear it.
Sento il suono delle campanelle della chiesa.
I hear the church bells ring.Le sento.
I hear them.
Sento le canzoni di Natale.
I hear the songs of Christmas.Le sento.
I hear them.
Hai sentito il rumore in piazza dal presipe vivente?
Have you heard the noise in the piazza from the living nativity scene?Ho sentito il rumore.
I heard the noise.
L’ho sentito.
I heard it.
Ho ascoltato mio fratello suonare il violino per la festa di Natale.
I listened to my brother play the violin for the Christmas party.L’ho ascoltato.
I listened to him.
Ho ascoltato la mia sorella cantare le canzoni natalizie per la vigilia di Natale.
I listened to my sister sing Christmas carols for Christmas Eve.L’ho ascoltata.
I listened to her.

 

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What I smell… and… The scents of

this Christmas – in Italian

The present tense form for “I smell…” is rendered in Italian with the phrase  sentire l’odore di,  and is, “Io sento l’odore di…” But, of course, we always leave out the Italian subject pronoun, so the phrase that Italians use is conversation is just, “Sento l’odore di…” 

If food cooking on the stove smells good, we can say it has, “Un bel profumo,” or “A good smell/aroma.” The word profumo also means scent and the fragrance, and can refer to the scent of a freshly cut Christmas tree or the perfume someone is wearing.

If we want to talk about a lovely scent that we smell, we can use the phrase, “Sento il profumo di…” for “I smell the scent of…” 

To complete the phrases above, just add what it is you smell after the phrase!  Remember to combine di with one of the definite articles that is used to describe the thing you smell.  You will remember that il, lo, i, gli, l’ are our masculine definite articles and la, le, l’ are our feminine definite articles, and all of these Italian words mean “the.”

(If you need a grammar refresher on how to di is combined with the definite articles in Italian, please visit our Conversational Italian for Travelers Just the Grammar reference book.)  

If we want to ask someone if they can smell the same thing we do, we can simply say, “Puoi sentire l’odore di…?” for “Can you smell…?” More often, though this question is asked and answered in the past tense.  Below are some examples of how to form questions and answers with sentire odore di in the present and the past tense.

(Io) sento l’odore di…
(Io) sento il profumo di…
I smell…
(Tu) senti l’odore di…? Do you smell…?
Puoi sentire l’odore di? Can you smell?
Hai sentito l’odore di…? Have you smelled…?
Si, ho sentito l’odore di… Yes, I have smelled…
Yes, I smelled…
No, non ho sentito l’odore di… No, I have not smelled… 
No, I haven’t smelled…

 

Now, let’s put all our knowledge of the phrase it takes to describe what we can smell together! We  had fun in our Conversational Italian! group  describing some of the scents of Christmas.  Below are some examples. How many more can you think of?

I biscotti fatti in casa hanno un bel profumo.  Fa molto Natale!
The homemade cookies have a wonderful smell.  It is very Christmassy!
Sento il profumo dell’albero di Natale.
I smell the fragrance of the Christmas tree.
Ho sentito il profumo meraviglioso della cena di Natale a casa di mia nonna.
I have smelled the wonderful scent of Christmas dinner at my Grandmother’s house.L’ho sentito!
I’ve smelled it!

Remember these phrases, and have fun using them during Christmastime!
Auguri di buon Natale!

Just the Grammar from Conversational Italian for Travelers

Conversational Italian for Travelers “Just the Grammar”

   Available on amazon.com and Learn Travel Italian.com

Cuccidati – My Family’s Christmas Cookie

Sicilian Christmas Cookie Cuccidati
Kathryn for learntravelitalian.com
Kathryn Occhipinti, MD, for Learn Travel Italian.com

Last December, I attended an event called La Festa dei Cuccidati for lovers of the Sicilian Christmas cookies called “cuccidati.”   It was organized by Salvatore Sciacca, director of the Chicagoland Italian American Professionals,

The event took place at Casa Italia in Stone Park,  the cultural center and central meeting place for Italian-Americans in the Chicagoland area for many decades.  There was a wonderful turnout that day for this event, and there were many, many varieties of cuccidati, all beautifully presented and available to taste.

We had dozens and dozens of cuccidati to sample – all donated for benefit of Casa Italia – from local bakeries and also from individual families.  The family recipes had, of course, been handed down through the generations, and many recipes were proudly displayed along with their cookies. There were more than 20  different varieties!  There was a contest for the best bakery cookie and also the best homemade cookie.  There was a demonstration as well.

All this is to say that I was really looking forward to this event, and it did not disappoint in the number and variety of cuccidati available.  Making this cookie with my mother, aunts, and now my children, has always been a highlight of the Christmas season for me.  I was looking forward to sharing this tradition with members of the community that I have come to know in Chicagoland, and so excited that they, too, shared special memories of the same Christmas treats that I loved.

Although, a funny thing happened.  I found out that the cookies that my family makes and calls “cuccidati,” are not exactly what were made that day.  In fact, all of the varieties that day used a fig filling, while my family recipe uses a combination of raisins, almonds, and citrus.  So, I did a bit of research, and although I have not found the exact recipe for my family’s cookie online, I have found many similar recipes.  I have an idea that it is just one of many similar “types” of Sicilian Christmas cookies that have developed over the years.

Visit the recent Learn Italian!blog post from December 1, 2017, to read about my family’s cuccidati method if you like.  An excerpt is below.

I’d love to hear from anyone who makes a cookie with similar shapes or a similar filling!  And, whatever your family traditions this holiday season, I wish everyone, ” Auguri di buone feste natalizie!”

 

Cuccidati: Traditional Sicilian Christmas Cookies 

Italian Christmas traditions are unique to each region of the Italy and have been lovingly handed down within families through the generations. Cuccidati – a version of Christmas cookie that probably originated after the Arabs introduced oranges and almonds to Sicily centuries ago – play an important part in the Christmas celebration in Sicily even today.

All Sicilian cuccidati, or any Italian cookie for that matter, are unlike what Americans think of when they think of cookies. Most Italian cookies are made from dough that cooks up drier than American cookies and there is much more variation in the presentation.  Sicilian cookies come in a multitude of different shapes and sizes and fruit fillings are often enclosed in the cookies as a special treat.

The recipe given below is for a Sicilian Christmas cookie—my family calls them “cuccidati,” although they are not identical to most of the cookies found online under this name.  The cookies in this recipe start out as the “typical” cuccidati: one long “tube” of sweet, Italian pie-crust-like dough, which contains a dried fruit and nut center. (No figs in our version, by the way.) But, instead of then cutting the tube into bite-sized pieces that are finished with icing, my family cuts larger pieces, which are then formed into different shapes, and finishes the cuccidati with a sprinkle of powdered sugar.  Whatever the name, this is just one version out of many dried, fruit-filed cookies still made in Sicilian bakeries today to celebrate the Christmas season.

When I was a child, my family always gathered the weekend before Christmas to share our creativity while we formed our cuccidati into wreaths, ribbons, or candy cane-like forms.  They could be completely covered in dough, which would allow for a creative, fringe-like covering, or left open.  The sides could be pinched for decoration if like, similar to how Americans form a pie crust along the rim of their pies. If you would like to see how the various shapes of these cookies are made, visit the Stella Lucente Italian Pinterest site.

The ingredients for the cuccidati filling are considered easy to come by today, but remember that dried fruit, including raisins and oranges and spices like cinnamon were considered special when the cookies originated.  These filling ingredients were only found only in well-off households. Since the filling ingredients are difficult to chop and mix together, in some Sicilian towns “back in the day,” people would bring their filling to the butcher to mix together for them in his meat grinder, which had been newly cleaned for the season for this purpose.

Despite the few ingredients in traditional cuccidati, and the difficulty of making the filling with them, the dried fruit has a rich sweetness, the roasted almonds a robust flavor, and the cinnamon, orange, and citron add a complexity of flavor that goes beyond its simple ingredients. Try our recipe this Christmas season for a taste of Sicilian tradition!
—Kathryn Occhipinti

Click here for the recipe and method to make cuccidati.

Visit www.learntravelitalian.com for more of my Italian and Italian-American recipes, cultural notes and  advanced Italian language blog posts updated monthly. Click on the link “our blog” in the upper right hand corner to reach blog.Learn Travel Italian.com.