Italian Phrases We Use EVERY Day! You Make Me… “Fare Causativo”

Burano in Venice, Italy and Everyday Italian phrases
Kathryn for learntravelitalian.com
Kathryn Occhipinti, MD, for Learn Travel Italian.com

Do you want to speak Italian more easily and confidently by the end of 2019? Well, now almost half the year has passed and  I hope my blogs have made you reach your goal so far this year!

As I’ve said before, I believe that “commonly used phrases” are the key for how we can all build fluency in any language in a short time.

If we learn how to incorporate “commonly used phrases” when we speak Italian, we will be able to form descriptive sentences about what other people make us do  or how other people make us feel – just as we do in our native language!

Check out some popular American songs to see how often this concept comes up in language.  Catchy tunes like, “You Make Me Feel Brand New,”  sung by the Stylistics, or “You Make Me Feel Like a Natural Women,” sung by Aretha Franklin are two examples that come to mind, although there are many more.  Read below and you will see what I mean.

This post is the 22nd in a series of Italian phrases we have been trying out in our Conversational Italian! Facebook group.  If you’d like to read the earlier posts in the series, “Italian Phrases We Use EVERY Day!” just click HERE

Many “commonly used phrases” start with the words
  “You make me…” or  “I make you…”

 If I want to use the English causative verb “make,”
in Italian I must use
the
 Fare Causativo

See below for how this works.

As we all master these phrases, so will you. Try my method and let me know how it works. What sentences will you create with these phrases?

Please reply. I’d love to hear from you! Or join our Conversational Italian! group discussion on Facebook.

The basics of the Italian language are introduced in the Conversational Italian for Travelers textbook and reference books Just the Verbs and Just the Grammar  

                       found on amazon.com and Learn Travel Italian.com.

The rights to purchase the Conversational Italian for Travelers books in PDF format on two electronic devices can also be obtained at Learn Travel Italian.com.

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Expressing the  English  Causative Verb

“Make”
with the Italian “Fare Causativo”

The verb “make” is called a “causative verb,” and is one of the three true causative verbs in English, which are: let, have, and make.

English speakers use the verb “make” to describe how someone has made them do  something or how someone has made them feel.  In other words, in this type of situation, the subject of the sentence is the instigator that will make the stated action take place for someone else.

I’ll try to make you see how this works using some example sentences in English conversation before we move on to Italian.  In English, we can say, “You are making me cry!” or “He makes me feel so special!”  In a less dramatic situation, we can form a question such as, “Are you making me go to school today?” or a statement such as, “She makes me go to school.”

In each case, the subject of the sentence is the instigator of the action that takes place, and therefore the verb “make” must be conjugated to match this person or persons.*

The sentence structure in English is simple:

 Make (conjugated) + Direct Object + Infinitive Verb
(+ optional adverb or indirect object)

The Italian verb fare means “to do” or “to make,” and is the Italian causative verb to use in this situation,  also known as the “fare causativo.” The sentence structure in Italian is the same as for English, except that for Italian (as usual) the direct object should be placed before the conjugated form of the verb fare. 

Direct Object + Fare (conjugated) + Infinitive Verb
(+ optional adverb or indirect object)

This is easy enough in English when we break down the example sentences:

You are making + me + cry.

He makes + me + feel (+ so special)!

She makes + me + go (+ to school).

A few pointers about Italian, and then we will try our example sentences.

First, let’s take a look at how subject pronoun use differs in Italian and English.  Remember that the subject pronoun (I, you, he/she, we, you all, they)  is usually left out of the sentence in Italian.  The verb ending in Italian will signal who the subject is.

So, to say, “You make…” instead of, “Tu fai…” say simply, “Fai…”  

For the Italian third person singular, a simple,“Fa…” may be fine for “He makes…” and “She makes…” since the individuals involved in the conversation usually know who is being referred to. But, if a speaker wants to clarify or to emphasize exactly who is the subject under discussion, the Italian subject pronoun can be used, and the phrase becomes “Lui fa…” or “Lei fa…”  

Second, it is OK to just use the simple Italian present tense to render the same meaning as the English present progressive tense (the “-ing” tense). Some phrases just sound better to the English speaker in the present progressive tense, and we tend to use this tense a lot.  But in Italian, the present progressive tense is used more sparingly, mostly to emphasize that something is happening exactly at the moment of conversation. So instead of the usual English phrase, “You are making…” an equivalent Italian phrase will usually be, “You make…” Just remember that the simple present tense in Italian can have several different meanings in English, such as: “You make…”  You are making…”  and “You do make…”

Finally, the direct object pronouns mi, ti, lo, la, ci, vi, li, le will go before the Italian verb, as usual.

Now, let’s to render our example sentences in Italian:

You are making + me + cry.
(Tu)  Mifai + piangere.

He makes + me + feel (+ so special).
(Lui)  Mifa + sentire (+ così speciale).

She makes + me + go (+ to school).
(Lei)  Mi + fa + andare (+ a scuola)

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We can keep on going with our first example sentence using the fare causativo if we want to, and use all of the conjugations of fare, depending on who is making us do what!

Let’s see how this works in the table below, with our conjugated verb fare in green and our direct object in red.  If a subject pronoun is used, it is also in green to match the conjugation of fare. Really, once you remember this “Italian formula” it is easy to describe who is making you do something!

      Mi fai piangere. You make me cry.
You are making me cry.
Lui mi fa piangere. He makes me cry.
He is making me cry.
Lei mi fa piangere. She makes me cry.
She is making me cry.
      Mi fate piangere. You all make me cry.
You all are making me cry.
      Mi fanno piangere. They make me cry.
They are making me cry.

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Should we try to use the fare causativo in the past tense?  Why not?  It’s easy!  And our formula works for any Italian tense, by the way!

Check out the table below. Remember the different uses  for the passato prossimo and imperfetto past tenses! For a refresher, check out Chapters 10-14  in our Conversational Italian for Travelers “Just the Verbs” book! 

       Mi hai fatto piangere ieri.
       Mi facevi piangere.
You made me cry yesterday.
You used to make me cry.
Lui mi ha fatto piangere ieri.
Lui mi faceva piangere.
He made me cry yesterday.
He used to make me cry.
Lei mi ha fatto piangere ieri.
Lei mi faceva piangere
She made me cry yesterday.
She used to make me cry.
      Mi  avete fatto piangere ieri.
      Mi  facevate piangere.
You all made me cry yesterday.
You used to make me cry.
      Mi  hanno fatto piangere ieri.
      Mi  facevano piangere.
They made me cry yesterday.
They used to make me cry.

One more important past tense sentence to remember is:

Mi ha fatto piacere vederti                             It’s made me very happy to see you!

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Now let’s try  to describe what we are making someone else do for us using the fare causativo.  Changing our formula to do this is simple! Now “I” will be the instigator of the action, so we must keep the verb fare in the io form, which is faccio, and change the direct object pronoun to describe who we are making do something!

 

      Ti  faccio piangere. I make you cry.
I am making you cry.
       La faccio piangere. I make her cry.
I am making her cry.
      Vi   faccio piangere. I make you all cry.
I am making you all cry.
      Le   faccio piangere. I make them cry. (all female group)
I am making them cry.

*In English, we conjugate present tense verbs so infrequently that we may not even realize what we are doing! The only ending that changes for a regular present tense verb in English is the third person singular. And in the case of “to make” the only change is to add an “s” at the end of the verb.  That is why we English speakers rely so much on our subject pronouns.  Here are the conjugations for the verb “to make” in English, so you will see what I mean:

I make,  You make, She/He makes, We make, You all make, They make.

I, You, She, He, We, You all, They… are making.

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Remember how to use the Fare Causativo and I guarantee you will use this formula every day!

 

Conversational Italian for Travelers: “Just the Verbs”

   Available on amazon.com and Learn Travel Italian.com

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Italian Phrases We Use EVERY Day! “Let me…” and “Let’s!” Lasciare and Fare

Burano in Venice, Italy and Everyday Italian phrases
Kathryn for learntravelitalian.com
Kathryn Occhipinti, MD, for Learn Travel Italian.com

Do you want to speak Italian more easily and confidently by the end of 2019? Well, it is now April and  I hope my blogs have helped to let you reach your goal so far this year!

As I’ve said before, I believe that “commonly used phrases” are the key for how we can all build fluency in any language in a short time.

If we learn how to incorporate “commonly used phrases” when we speak Italian, we will be able to use the causative verb “let” just as we do in our native language! Read below and you will see what I mean.

This post is the 21st in a series of Italian phrases we have been trying out in our Conversational Italian! Facebook group.  If you’d like to read the earlier posts in the series, “Italian Phrases We Use EVERY Day!” just click HERE

Many “commonly used phrases” start with the phrase
 “Let me…” or “Let’s…”

 If we want someone to let us do something in Italian we must use the verbs Lasciare or Fare

And if we want to encourage someone else to do something, we must use
a verb in the noi command form 

See below for how this works.

As we all master these phrases, so will you. Try my method and let me know how it works. What sentences will you create with these phrases?

Please reply. I’d love to hear from you! Or join our Conversational Italian! group discussion on Facebook.

The basics of the Italian language are introduced in the Conversational Italian for Travelers textbook and reference books Just the Verbs and Just the Grammar  

                       found on Amazon.com and Learn Travel Italian.com.

The rights to purchase the Conversational Italian for Travelers books in PDF format on two electronic devices can also be obtained at Learn Travel Italian.com.

************************************************

Expressing the  English  Causative Verb

“Let”

in Italian Conversation 

The verb “let” is called a “causative verb,” and is one of the three true causative verbs in English, which are: let, have, and make.

English speakers use the verb “let” to direct someone to do something.  In other words, with the verb “let,” the subject of the sentence is relying on or needs someone else to “cause” the action that will take place.

Let’s try some example sentences in English conversation to help us understand this concept before we move on to Italian.  In English, we might say, “Let/Leave me alone!” or “Let me think!”  In a less dramatic situation, we can form a question such as, “Will you let me use the car today?”  or a statement such as, “She let her son drive the car today.”  In each case, the subject is not actually completing the action – someone else is.

The sentence structure in English is simple:

Let + object + verb (+ optional descriptive phrase)

At first glance, it may seem like the Italian verb lasciare would provide a good substitute for the English causative verb let.  And, in many common Italian phrases, lasciare is indeed used as a substitute for “let” to express the ideas of: to permit, to allow, to let go, or to leave. 

Listed below are some common Italian expressions that take lasciare.   You will  notice that when lasciare is used in a causative situation,  the ending is often in the informal command form. The object pronouns (lo = him, la = her) will therefore be attached to the end of the conjugated verb and are shown in red in the table for clarity.  And remember, to command someone not to do something, use the Italian verb in its infinitive form! 

 

Lascialo venire a casa mia oggi! Let him come to my house today!
Non lasciare che la passi liscia! Don’t let him get away with it! (colloquial)
Lascia perdere!

Lascia stare!
Let it go!  Don’t think about it anymore!
Forget about it!

It was nothing! Don’t mention it!
Forget about it!
Lascialo stare! / Lasciala stare! Let him be! / Let her be!
Leave him alone!  / Leave her alone!
Non lasciare andare i tuoi sogni! Don’t let go of your dreams!
Lascia andare tua sorella al cinema!
Mi ha lasciato andare.
Let your sister go to the movies!
He let me go.
Lasciami andare!
Lascia
mi solo(a)! / Lasciami!
Let me go!
Leave me alone! / Leave me!

 

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As a side note, the verbs lasciare (to leave) and  lasciarsi (to leave each other) come into play when we describe a romantic break up between a couple.

L’ha lasciato e ora quella storia (d’amore) è finita. 
She left him and now that (love) story is over.

Below is an example sentence two people might use talk about a couple that has “broken up” or two people who have “left each other” in the Italian way of thinking.

Loro si sono lasciati. They have broken up.

If you are one of the two people in the relationship and want to talk about “breaking up”:

Ci lasciamo stasera. We (will) break up/are breaking up tonight.
Non ci lasciamo, ma… We are not breaking up but..
Ci sono lasciati il mese scorso. We broke up last month.

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Getting back to our original topic…

How else can we express the causative verb “let” in Italian?  As it turns out, there are many other ways!  But to finish this blog, we will focus two of the most common ways …

Command Form Fammi for “Let Me…”

The familiar command form of fare, which is the verb fa, can be combined with the direct object pronoun mi (me) in order to create the English phrase that means, “Let me…” 

When attaching a direct object to the familiar command verb fa, the first letter of the direct object is doubled. This holds true for mi, ti, lo, la, ci, and vi.  So, in order to say, “Let me…” the word to use is “Fammi…”

Perhaps the most commonly heard phrase of this type is Fammi pensare…” for “Let me think…” when someone wants to create a pause in the conversation rather than responding right away. You may remember that this phrase has come up in already in our previous blogs about pensare.  A few more common phrases that use this sentence structure are listed below.  Listen carefully to Italian movies or read Italian books and I am sure you will come up with many other situations to use “Fammi…”

Fammi pensare… Let me think…
Fammi vedere… Let me see… / Let me have a look…
Fammi sapere! Let me know!
Fammi  fare questa cosa!
Fammelo fare!*
Let me make/do this (thing)!
Let me make/do it!

*Note that when combining fammi + lo, the letter i in fammi must change to an e, since we are combining pronouns: mi +lo = me lo.

 

Command Form Noi  for “Let’s”

Now, let’s finish by learning how to say “let’s” or “let us” in Italian.  As it turns out, the easy-to-remember command form for the noi conjugation of Italian verbs is used to express the meaning of “let’s.” The -iamo ending of the command form is identical to the present tense ending, and is an easy ending that even the beginning student of Italian should know!

One of the most commonly heard verbs in Italian-American families is “Andiamo!” for “Let’s go!”  Therefore, when we encourage our family or friends to go somewhere in Italian, we are simply using the command form of the present tense!

So to encourage a group of people to do something simply say,  “Facciamolo!” or “Facciamola!” for “Let’s do it!”   

Or, maybe you would like a group to quiet down and listen to a song on the radio or a show on TV.  You might say, “Ascoltiamo!” for  “Let’s listen!” 

Or, maybe you are not sure something will really happen and you want to say, “Vediamo! for “Let’s see!”

How many more situations can you think of to use the noi command form?

Remember the many ways to say “Let me” and “Let’s” with Lasciare and Fare and I guarantee you will use these phrases  every day!

 

 

Conversational Italian for Travelers: “Just the Verbs”

   Available on amazon.com and Learn Travel Italian.com

Buona Festa della Donna 2019

I’ve re-blogged the original post from 2017 in honor of Womens Day this year.

Our saying is about a truly Italian holiday, the Festa della Donna, which was celebrated on March 8 this year. It is a simple holiday started by Rita Montagnana and Teresa Mattei after World War II (dopoguerra)during which men give the mimosa flower to all the women in their lives as a show of appreciation and love.

The saying below is a tribute to Sicilian women that was written by my favorite, and world-renowned Sicilian author, Andrea Camilleri. His mystery series has been made into the hugely successful BBC television series Inspector Montalbano, segments of which I watch almost every day to keep up on my “local” Italian.

Buona Festa della Donna!

Il 8 di Marzo

Festa della Donna 2017
Buona Festa della Donna! A tribute to Sicilian women from renown Sicilian author Andrea Camilleri.

Featured image photo by Dénes Emőke – London, CC BY-SA 2.5, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=15200409

Italian Phrases We Use EVERY Day! Pensare (Part 2) What I am thinking about…

Burano in Venice, Italy and Everyday Italian phrases
Kathryn for learntravelitalian.com
Kathryn Occhipinti, MD, for Learn Travel Italian.com

Do you want to speak Italian more easily and confidently by the end of 2019? Well, it is now March and I think my blogs have been helping you so far with your goal this year!

As I’ve said before, I believe that “commonly used phrases” are the key for how we can all build fluency in any language in a short time.

If we learn how to incorporate “commonly used phrases” when we speak Italian, we will be able to express what we are thinking about- just as we do in our native language! Read below and you will see what I mean.

This post is the 20th in a series of Italian phrases we have been trying out in our Conversational Italian! Facebook group.  If you’d like to read the earlier posts in the series, “Italian Phrases We Use EVERY Day!” just click HERE

Many “commonly used phrases” that allow us to describe our thoughts
start with the phrase
 “I think …”

 If we think  about something, in Italian we must say
“I think that …” 

which will lead us to the Italian subjunctive mood.
See below for how this works.

As we all master these phrases, so will you. Try my method and let me know how it works. What sentences will you create with these phrases?

Please reply. I’d love to hear from you! Or join our Conversational Italian! group discussion on Facebook.

The basics of the Italian language are introduced in the Conversational Italian for Travelers textbook and reference books Just the Verbs and Just the Grammar  

                       found on amazon.com and Learn Travel Italian.com.

The rights to purchase the Conversational Italian for Travelers books in PDF format on two electronic devices can also be obtained at Learn Travel Italian.com.

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What I Think…

In Italian Conversation 

When an Italian wants to describe what he is thinking about, he  must use the verb pensare, and this is the verb that will be the topic of our blog today.

Pensare works a bit differently from the “typical” Italian -are verb.

  • When using the verb pensare to express a thought one person or a group has for themselves, pensare must be followed by the prepositions “di” or “a.”
  • “Pensare di” is used when the phrase to follow starts with a verb – which will be in the infinitive form (to see, to start, etc.).
  • “Pensare a” is used when the phrase to follow describes a thought about someone or something.

Sperare + di + infinitive verb
or
Sperare ++ noun or pronoun

So, “I think…” would be ” Io penso di…” or ” Io penso a…” But of course, we leave out the subject pronoun in Italian, so the phrases become:“Penso di…” or “Penso a…”

“We think… “ would be: “Pensiamo di…” or  “Pensiamo a…”

Or, one can just say, “Pensiamo!”  for “Let’s think!” in order to encourage an entire group to think about a certain topic.

Listed in the table below are some every day phrases that use the verb pensare to express what we are thinking about.  Notice that in each of these phrases the subject is expressing a thought he or the group has for themselves.   

Simply memorize the first phrase, “Penso di si,” as it is a common expression that will come in handy when agreeing with people.  For the rest of the phrases below, it will be important to remember that the simple present tense in Italian can have many different meanings in English, such as: “I think,” “I am thinking,” “I do think,” and “I am going to think.” But for the Italian, simply use the phrases, “Penso di…” or “Penso a…”  

In a similar way, when translating the Italian infinitive verb that describes an action you are thinking of, use the English present progressive tense (with the “-ing”ending) to express the same idea.

Try out these sentences by saying them out loud.  Add additional qualifiers at the end of the sentence when using these phrases to describe “when” you think something might occur if you like.  There are, of course, many more “things” one can think about during the course of an ordinary day than we have listed below! How many more can you think of?  

Penso di “si.” I think so.
Pensiamo! Let’s think!
Penso a te.
Penserò a lui per sempre.
(I am) Thinking of you.
I will always think of him.
Penso alla bella macchina rossa  che tu hai ogni giorno. I think of the beautiful red car that you have every day.
Penso di… viaggiare a Roma d’estate.  I am thinking of… traveling to Rome
in the summer.
Pensiamo di… iniziare il progetto domani.  We are thinking of… starting the project tomorrow.

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As you may have noticed from the example sentences above, many different ideas can be linked to a phrase that starts with pensare.  By learning to start phrases properly with pensare, we can build longer and more meaningful sentences in Italian and express complex thoughts. But we are not done yet!  Because…

  • When one uses the verb pensare to express a thought he has regarding someone else or something else, he must follow the verb with the conjunction “che,” which means “that.” In fact, the word “che” can never be left out of an Italian sentence of this type that is used to link  two separate phrases (which is not the case in English).
  •  “Che” will then be followed by a verb in the subjunctive mood, which will start the phrase that follows, in order to describe what the subject is thinking about.

Pensare + che + subjunctive present tense verb

Just what is the subjunctive mood?  The subjunctive mood is the type of verb form that Italians use to express a wide range of emotions: hopes (as we have reviewed in Blog #15 of this series , thoughts (as we are discussing now), beliefs, doubts, uncertainty, desire or a feeling.  There is a long list of phrases that trigger the subjunctive mood, and many of these phrases will be the subject of later blogs.

For now, let’s review the commonly used present tense form of the subjunctive mood for the verb essere, which means “to be.” 

Che is included in parentheses in the first column of our table below as a reminder that these verb forms are typically introduced with  the conjunction che.  Also, make sure to include the subject pronoun in your sentence after che for clarity, since the singular verb forms are identical.

Practice the subjunctive verbs out loud by saying che , the subject  pronoun and then the correct verb form that follows.

Essere to be – Present Subjunctive Mood

(che) io sia I am
(che) tu sia you (familiar) are
(che) Lei
(che) lei/lui
sia you (polite) are
she/he is
     
(che) noi siamo we are
(che) voi siate you all are
(che) loro siano they are

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Example Phrases Using “Essere” in the Present Tense Subjunctive Mood

The verb essere (to be) is commonly used in the subjunctive mood the when describing what we think about something or someone.

For instance, rather than simply stating a fact, if we are not sure, we may say, “I think…” this or that is true and then we will need to use the subjunctive mood!

Or, let’s say  we went to see a movie, and want to describe what we think about the experience or the actors.  Or, maybe we are talking with a friend and telling them what we think about a mutual friend or acquaintance. Then we must use the subjunctive mood in our sentence!

To follow are some examples of when the Italian subjunctive mood in the present tense might be used in conversation during daily life.  Notice that the English translation is the same for the present tense examples and the Italian subjunctive examples used in the sentences below.

Present Tense
Phrase
Present Tense Phrase with the
Subjunctive Mood
Lei è bella. She is beautiful. Penso che lei sia bella. I think that she is beautiful.
L’insegnante è simpatico. The teacher is nice. Penso che l’insegnante sia simpatico. I think that the teacher is nice.
L’attrice è brava in quel film. The actress is great in that film. Penso che l’attrice sia brava in quel film.

 

I think that the actress is great in that film.
Il film è bello;
ti piacerà.
The film is good;  you will like it. Penso che il film sia bello; ti piacerà.

 

I think that the film is good; you will like it.*
Lei è contenta sulla scelta del vino per cena stasera. She is happy with the choice of wine for dinner tonight. Penso che lei sia contenta sulla scelta del vino per cena stasera.

 

I think that she is happy with the choice of wine for dinner tonight.
Loro sono bravi cantanti. They are wonderful singers. Penso che loro siano bravi cantanti. I think that they are wonderful singers.
“Falstaff” è l’ultima opera che Verdi ha scritto. “Falstaff”  is the last opera that Verdi wrote. Penso che “Falstaff” sia l’ultima opera che Puccini ha scritto.

 

I think that Falstaff is the last opera that Verdi wrote.
Lei è sposata. She is married. Penso che lei sia sposata. I think that she is married.
Loro sono ricchi. They are rich. Penso che loro siano ricchi. I think that they are rich.

Remember how to linkpensareto what you are thinking about and to the Italian subjunctive mood and I guarantee you will use this verb every day!

 

Conversational Italian for Travelers: “Just the Verbs”

   Available on amazon.com and Learn Travel Italian.com

 

Italian Phrases We Use EVERY Day! – How to say, “I love you” in Italian!

Burano in Venice, Italy and Everyday Italian phrases
www.learntravelitalian.com
Kathryn Occhipinti, MD for http://www.learntravelitalian.com

How do I say, “I love you?” in Italian?  Let me count the ways…

For Valentine’s Day this year, let’s learn how to greet all of  our loved ones warmly by saying, “I love you!” in Italian, using the correct phrases for our one true romantic love and for our family and friends.

For the last 2 years, we’ve been learning that “commonly used phrases” are the key for how we can all build fluency in any language in a short time.

Well, what common Italian phrases could be more important to learn than the phrases that mean “I love you”?

This post is the 19th in a series of Italian phrases we have been trying out in our Conversational Italian! Facebook group.  If you’d like to read the earlier posts in the series, “Italian Phrases We Use EVERY Day!”  just click HERE.

Many “commonly used phrases” that will help us talk more easily describe
 “I love you…”

We will discuss the Italian expressions for those we love – our one true love, our family and our friends.
 See below for how this works.

As we all master these phrases, so will you. Try my method and let me know how it works. What sentences will you create with these phrases?

Please reply. I’d love to hear from you! Or join our Conversational Italian! group discussion on Facebook.

The basics of the Italian language are introduced in the Conversational Italian for Travelers textbook and reference books Just the Verbs and Just the Grammar  

                       found on amazon.com and Learn Travel Italian.com.

The rights to purchase the Conversational Italian for Travelers books in PDF format on two electronic devices can also be obtained at Learn Travel Italian.com.

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Amare…

How to say, “I love you!” in Italian 

Let’s learn how to use the verb amare, which means “to love”  in Italian.  But be careful!  Because this is the Italian verb of romantic love! In fact, Italians often address their romantic love simply as “amore,” which is the noun that means “love.”  Italians also address loved ones as “amore mio,” which means “my love.” Beautiful, isn’t it?  The full conjugation of this important verb is given below, with the stressed syllables underlined.

Amare – to love

io amo I love
tu ami you (familiar) love
Lei/lei/lui ama you (polite) she/he loves
     
noi amiamo we love
voi amate you all love
loro amano they love

For our focus on conversational Italian, as usual, the most important conjugations to remember for the verb amare will be the first and second persons – amo and ami. We can use these two verbs when speaking to our “one true love,” to ask about and declare our feelings of love.

This is a bit tricky in Italian, though, since the sentence structure is different from English.  In English, we say, “I love you, putting the direct object pronoun “you” after the verb “love.” But, in Italian, the word order is the opposite. The direct object pronoun for “you,” is “ti” and ti is placed before the verb “love”.  So, “I love you,” is, “Io ti amo,” in Italian.  But, the subject pronoun, is left out as usual, so we come to the simple phrase, “Ti amo.”

To tell someone that you love them in Italian, you must think like an Italian!  In my mind, to keep this all straight, I use the English sentence structure, ” It is you who I love!”

When asking the question, “Do you love me?” in Italian, the sentence structure is the same as the statement, “You love me,” but with a raised voice at the end to signify that this is a question.  In Italian, it is not necessary to say, “Do you…?” the way we do in English when asking a question.  So, the Italian phrase would be, “Tu mi ami?” Leaving out the subject pronoun, we come to, “Mi ami?” for, “Do you love me?”

Let’s summarize:

amare to love in a romantic way
amore / amore mio love / my love
essere innamorato(a) di… to be in love with…
Mi ami? Do you love me?
Ti amo!  I love you!

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After you and your romantic love have announced your love to each other, you may want to describe your feelings to someone else.  Or, you may be talking to your friend about how someone you both know has fallen in love with another.  My favorite Italian phrase to describe this head over heels feeling is, “Ho/Ha perso la testa per…”  “I/he,she has lost their mind for…”

Another expression: essere pazzamente innamorati di…”  – “to be madly in love with…” 

“Sono pazzamente innamorato di lei.” = “I am madly in love with her.”

Or, “amare (qualcuno) alla follia” –  “to love (somebody) to distraction”. 

“Amo lei alla follia.”  = “I love her to distraction.”

Below are different variations of  the first phrase, which is the one I have heard most often,  listed in a table.  Of course, you can substitute a male name for “lui” and a female name for “lei” and use the same verb form. 

Ho perso la testa per lui! I’ve fallen in love with him!
Ho perso la testa per lei! I’ve fallen in love with her!
Lei ha perso la testa per lui! She has fallen in love with him!
Lui ha perso la testa per lei! He has fallen in love with her!

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The phrases we have just discussed for romantic love are very useful. But, we know that in life there is more than just romantic love.  What about our love for family and friends? For places or things?

In America, we seem to “love” everyone and everything – from our spouse to our best friend, our hometown, our favorite movie, a comfortable pair of shoes, pizza… Everyone and everything can be “loved” in America!  But, as an Italian friend once told me. it is best to reserve amare for that one and only, special romantic love.** 

So, how do we tell family and friends that we love them in Italian?

We use the Italian phrasal verb form “volere bene (a qualcuno)” and the expression, “Ti voglio bene,” which really doesn’t translate well into English.  It has been translated as, “I care for you,” or, “I wish you well,” but really, it is the way Italians tell their children, parents, and friends that they love one another.

The phrase, “Ti voglio bene,” is also used frequently between spouses or romantic couples.  In other words, this phrase can also be used to express one’s romantic love for another.  When you watch old Italians movies, listen closely, and you will hear this phrase come up often!

Mi vuoi bene?  Do you love me/care for me?
(for family and friends, and also your true love)
Ti voglio bene.  I love you/care for you/wish you well.

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Finally, when Italians want to say that they love a place or  thing, they usually use the verb piacere. Visit our blogs Piacere – How Italians Say, “I like it!”and Piacere – How Italians Say, “I liked it!”  to learn how the verb piacere works.

If you can learn to use the verbs amare and volere in these expressions,
you will have really learned to think in Italian!

Remember these phrases, and I hope you can use them every day!

**I have recently seen and heard exceptions to this rule about amare in advertisements: on a billboard in Milan, in an Italian magazine, and on Italian TV, but I still think it safest to be careful when choosing to use the verb amare.

*Some of this material has been reprinted from our Conversational Italian for Travelers books.

Just the Grammar from Conversational Italian for Travelers
Conversational Italian for Travelers “Just the Grammar”

Italian Phrases We Use EVERY Day! Piacere: How Italians say, “I like it!”

Burano in Venice, Italy and Everyday Italian phrases
Kathryn for learntravelitalian.com
Kathryn Occhipinti, MD, for Learn Travel Italian.com

Do you want to speak Italian more easily and confidently by the end of 2019? Well, let’s start-off running toward our goal this January by learning how to use the Italian verb piacere to say, “I like it!” in Italian.

The Italian verb piacere will allow us to describe an important part of our feelings – our likes and dislikes.  And, piacere is a very important verb for the traveler to Italy to know because there are so many places and things “to like” in Italy!

As I’ve said before, I believe that “commonly used phrases” are the key for how we can all build fluency in any language in a short time.  

If we learn to form sentences in Italian describing the places and things that we like, we will be on our way to building  own personal vocabulary of “commonly used phrases.”    Read below and you will see what I mean.

This post is the 18th in a series of Italian phrases we have been trying out in our Conversational Italian! Facebook group.  If you’d like to read the earlier posts in the series, “Italian Phrases We Use EVERY Day!”  just click HERE

Many “commonly used phrases” that allow us to describe our feelings
start with the phrase
 “I like …”

 In order to describe what we like in Italian,
we must learn how to use the verb
Piacere

Piacere will also allow us to describe what we don’t like!

See below for how the Italian verb piacere works. Then see how many more ways you can think of to use piacere?

Please reply. I’d love to hear from you! Or join our Conversational Italian! group discussion on Facebook.

The basics of the Italian language are introduced in the Conversational Italian for Travelers textbook and reference books Just the Verbs and Just the Grammar  

                       found on amazon.com and Learn Travel Italian.com.

The rights to purchase the Conversational Italian for Travelers books in PDF format on two electronic devices can also be obtained at Learn Travel Italian.com.

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How to Use the Italian Verb Piacere to Say…

“I Like It!”

The Italian verb piacere literally means “to be pleasing.” Italians use this verb when they want to express the idea that they like something. It is how Italians say, “I like it!”

It should first be noted that piacere has an irregular conjugation.  Also, because the verb piacere  is most often used to refer to one or many things that we like, it works  differently than the regular Italian verbs that have an -ere ending.  In effect, the subject of the sentence that uses the verb piacere will be the thing or things that are liked, and therefore  the conjugated forms of piacere  that will be used most often are the singular and plural third person. 

The singular third person form of piacere is piace and the plural is piacciono.

So, rather than conjugate the verb piacere in its entirety,  for now we will focus on the two most important conjugations of piacere listed above.  Simple enough! But, the tricky part is actually how to use the verb piacere! First, we will discuss how we approach the topic in English.  Then, read on to see how we must really learn to think in Italian when we use piacere to say, “I like it!”

 

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In English, when we say we like something, we mention two things: what thing is being liked and by whom. So in English, we would say, I like the car, and fulfill these two requirements with the subject pronoun “I” and the direct object “car.”

But in Italian, the indirect object is used instead of the direct object, to describe to whom the thing is liked by or  is pleasing. If we want to change up this same English phrase into the Italian way of thinking, we could say, “The car is pleasing to me.” You will hopefully find the mixed Italianized-English phrase “is pleasing  to…” to be very helpful to understand how piacere really works!

The tricky thing about this type of phrase in Italian is that the conjugation of piacere will have to agree with the number of things that are being liked. Remember that the subject of the sentence in Italian is actually the things themselves.

So, if one thing is liked, piace is used.

If many things are liked, piacciono is used.

Italians then put one of the indirect object pronouns – mi, ti, Le, le, gli, ci, vi, or glibefore the verb, at the beginning of the sentence, to denote to whom the thing is pleasing

As a refresher, here is the meaning of the indirect object pronouns in this situation:

mi to me
ti to you (familiar)
Le to you (polite)
le to her
gli to him
ci to us
vi to you all
gli to them

 

Now, lets put this all together!

For our examples below, let’s pretend we are in a store to buy a new dress – either for ourselves or someone we know.  The actual object we like is not important – the only thing that matters is if there is one or many of them.  The grayed out lettering is mixed Italianized-English to help us to understand how the verb piacere works.  

Piace — to be pleasing
Use these phrases if one thing is liked
Mi piace il vestito. The dress is pleasing to me. I like the dress.
Ti piace il vestito. The dress is pleasing to you. (fam.) You like the dress.
Le piace il vestito.

Gli/Le piace il vestito.

The dress is pleasing to you. (pol.)

The dress is pleasing to him/her.

You like the dress.

He/she likes the dress.

     
Ci piace il vestito. The dress is pleasing to us. We like the dress.
Vi piace il vestito. The dress is pleasing to you all. You all like the dress.
Gli piace il vestito. The dress is pleasing to them. They like the dress.

 

 

Piacciono — to be pleasing
Use these phrases 
if more than one thing is liked
Mi piacciono i vestiti. The dresses are pleasing to me. I like the dresses.
Ti piacciono i vestiti. The dresses are pleasing to you. (fam.) You like the dresses.
Le piacciono i vestiti.

Gli/le piacciono i vestiti.

The dresses are pleasing to you. (pol.)

The dresses are pleasing to him/her.

You like the dresses.

He/she likes the dresses.

     
Ci piacciono i vestiti. The dresses are pleasing to us. We like the dresses.
Vi piacciono i vestiti. The dresses are pleasing to you all. You all like the dresses.
Gli piacciono i vestiti. The dresses are pleasing to them. They like the dresses.

 

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Now that we understand the Italian way of thinking used to describe the things we like, we can use the same method to describe how  much we like what we are doing. 

 Simply follow the indirect object and the verb piacere in the third person singular – piace – with an infinitive verb! Notice that the infinitive Italian verb can be translated two different ways in English. 

Mi piace viaggiare in Italia. I like to travel/traveling to Italy.
Ti piace studiare l’italiano. You like to study/studying Italian.
Gli piace guidare la macchina nuova. He likes to drive/driving the new car.

 

And, to say that we do not like something, or something we are doing, just add “non”  before piace.  Below are our same three example sentences in the negative.

Non mi piace viaggiare in Italia. I don’t like to travel/traveling in Italy.
Non ti piace studiare l’italiano. You don’t like to study/studying Italian.
Non gli piace guidare la macchina nuova. He doesn’t like to drive/driving the new car.

 

Finally, if you really like something, add molto after piace!

Mi piace molto il vestito!  I really like the dress!

Remember how to use the Italian verb piacere, and I guarantee you will use it every day!

 

Conversational Italian for Travelers: “Just the Verbs”

   Available on amazon.com and Learn Travel Italian.com

Italian Phrases We Use EVERY Day! Pensare (Part 1) What I am thinking…

Burano in Venice, Italy and Everyday Italian phrases
Kathryn for learntravelitalian.com
Kathryn Occhipinti, MD, for Learn Travel Italian.com

The Christmas season is upon us and soon it will be a new year! Have you thought about making a New Year’s resolution to speak Italian more easily and confidently by the end of 2019? Well, it is never too late to start to learn Italian, and  I think my blogs can help you with your goal this coming year!

For the last 2 years, we’ve been learning that “commonly used phrases” are the key for how we can all build fluency in any language in a short time.

If we learn how to incorporate “commonly used phrases” when we speak Italian, we will be able to express important thoughts – our own thoughts – just as we do in our native language!  Read below and you will see what I mean.

This post is the 17th in a series of Italian phrases we have been trying out in our Conversational Italian! Facebook group.  If you’d like to read the earlier posts in the series, “Italian Phrases We Use EVERY Day!”  just click HERE.

Many “commonly used phrases” that will help us talk more easily describe
 “What I am thinking…”

We will discuss the Italian expressions for our everyday experiences:
“I think…”, “It came to mind…”, “I changed my mind…”
   “I’ll take care of it!”

 See below for how this works.

As we all master these phrases, so will you. Try my method and let me know how it works. What sentences will you create with these phrases?

Please reply. I’d love to hear from you! Or join our Conversational Italian! group discussion on Facebook.

The basics of the Italian language are introduced in the Conversational Italian for Travelers textbook and reference books Just the Verbs and Just the Grammar  

                       found on amazon.com and Learn Travel Italian.com.

The rights to purchase the Conversational Italian for Travelers books in PDF format on two electronic devices can also be obtained at Learn Travel Italian.com.

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Pensare…

What I Am Thinking in Italian

Many, many Italian expressions use the verb pensare, which is most often translated as “to think”.  You can imagine how this verb will come up often in conversation – with family and close friends, of course, but also with acquaintances.  

In fact, the Italian verb pensare has so many uses in Italian, many of which do not translate directly into English, that we must really learn to think in Italian to master the use of this verb. But, once mastered, speaking with these phrases will truly help one to sound like a native!

Because this verb is so important, we will give the full conjugation below. You will notice that pensare is conjugated as a regular -are verb. As always, remember that the most important forms for conversation will be the first three, singular forms io, tu, Lei/lei/lui, and the noi form for the plural. The stressed syllable has been underlined.

Pensare – to think

io penso I think
tu pensi you (familiar) think
Lei/lei/lui pensa you (polite) she/he thinks
     
noi pensiamo we think
voi pensate you all think
loro pensano they think

 

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Read below for many (but certainly not all) of the phrases that use the verb pensare. These phrases have been put into groups in our table to aid in understanding the different situations in which pensare can be used.

First, some common expressions that use pensare with the meaning of to think are listed below. You will also notice that we’ve included  the phrase “I realized” in one of our expressions.  If you need help understanding this phrase, refer to our blog, “Italian Phrases We Use EVERY Day! What I realized…”

I should also note that the pronouns “ci” and  “ne” are an important component of many of the expressions that use the verb pensare.  These pronouns have been highlighted in red when they are attached to a verb, in order to make them easy to recognize and to separate them from the verb itself.  You may want to brush up on your understanding of how the  pronouns “ci” and “ne”  are used in sentences with the meaning of  “about it” and “of it” in  our Conversational Italian for Travelers text book or “Just the Grammar” book!

Che ne pensi? What do you think about it?
Pensaci bene! Think about it! / Really think it over!
Fammi pensare.
Fammici pensare.
Let me think.
Let me think about it.
Ora che inizio a pensare…
Ora che ho iniziato a pensare…
Now that I start to think…
Now that I’ve started to think…
Ora che ci penso bene…
Ora che ci ho pensato bene…
Now that I really think about it…
Now that I’ve really thought it over…
Che pensi? 
Che stai pensando?!
A cosa stavi pensando?!
Stavo pensando…
Pensandoci, mi sono reso(a) conto di…
What are you thinking?
What are you thinking?!
What were you thinking?!
I was thinking…
Thinking about it, I realized that…
Non serve a niente pensarci adesso. It doesn’t help thinking about it now.
Che ne pensavi?

 

What were you thinking about it?

 

Penso di/che…* I  think that…
Pensavo di/che…* I was thinking that…
Ho pensato di/che…* I thought that…

*How to use “di” and “che” with the verb pensare will be the topic of the another blog!

 

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Below are some expressions where pensare is directly translated into English with the meaning of  to take care of it.”   The verb itself does not actually mean “to take care of” but rather the expressions as a whole do mean that someone is taking care of something . I call these “idiomatic expressions,” but really these expressions just show the difference that sometimes occurs when one tries to expresses the same idea in English and Italian.

Another interesting thing to know about Italian, is that in order to emphasize who is doing what, or to signify one’s intent to do somethingthe subject pronoun (io, tu, lei/lui, etc…) is placed after the verb!

Here is an example situation for when to invert the usual Italian subject pronoun/verb order. Let’s say I am sitting in a room and having a conversation, eating, playing cards, etc. with a group of people when the doorbell to the house rings. I want to signify that I will get up and go to answer the door.  In this case,  I will say, “Vado io,” to mean, I will be the one to go to answer the door right now.” This concept is expressed a lot more concisely in Italian, isn’t it?

 

Ci penso io. I’ll take care of it. 
Ci pensi tu? Will you take care of it? 
Ci pensavo io.
Ci ho pensato io.
I was taking care of it.
I took care of it.

 


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Finally, let’s say we want to describe the circumstances around which our thought/thoughts  (pensiero/pensieri)  or idea/ideas (idea/idee) are based.  (Please note that when the English word idea is used in a phrase to mean a “guess” or “impression,” the Italian word, “impressione” is the correct translation.)

For instance, we can talk about how a thought or idea has come to our mind (mente) or into our head (testa) using the verb to come (venire), just as we would in English, and then go on to describe our thought.

Or, perhaps we have been thinking about something and want to talk about why we have changed our mind! It should be noted that Italians express a change of mind differently than an English speaker. To an Italian, the idea (idea) always changes, rather than one’s mind. But to an English speaker, it is the “mind” itself that changes.

If you want to say what you have changed your mind about, just add “su”, which in this case means “about” to the phrase and describe the change!

Mi viene in mente. (It) comes to mind.
Mi vengono in mente, tante cose. Many things came to mind.
Lots of things came to mind.
Ti vengono in testa, certe cose/ certe pensieri. Certain things/ Certain thoughts came into his head.
Mi è venuto in mente. It came to mind.
Cambio idea ogni giorno. I change my mind every day.
Ho cambiato idea su… I’ve changed my mind about…
Hai cambiato idea?  Have you changed your mind?
Ho cambiato idea su… I’ve changed my mind about…

 

If you can learn to use the verb pensare in these expressions,
you will have really learned to think in Italian!

Remember these phrases, and I guarantee you will use them every day!

*Some of this material has been reprinted from our Conversational Italian for Travelers books.

Stay tuned for more blog posts on this topic!

 

"Just the Verbs" from Conversational Italian for Travelers books
Conversational Italian for Travelers “Just the Verbs”

 

Italian Phrases We Use EVERY Day! Sperare (Part 2) – What I wish for the holidays…

Burano in Venice, Italy and Everyday Italian phrases

 

Kathryn for learntravelitalian.com
Kathryn Occhipinti, MD, for Learn Travel Italian.com

Do you want to speak Italian more easily and confidently by the end of 2018?  Well, the end-of-the year festivities and a new year are just around the corner!  I hope this blog will help you celebrate and bring good wishes to your family and friends.

As I’ve said before, I believe that “commonly used phrases” are the key for how we can all build fluency in any language in a short time.

If we learn how to incorporate “commonly used phrases” when we speak Italian, we will be able to express important feelings – like our  good wishes – just as we do in our native language!  We’ve already learned some important new conversational and  email phrases in Italian in our first blog  about the verb sperare.  Today we will expand on what we have already learned and wish a good holiday season and Happy New Year to all! Read below and you will see what I mean.

This post is the 16th in a series of Italian phrases we have been trying out in our Conversational Italian! Facebook group.  If you’d like to read the earlier posts in the series, “Italian Phrases We Use EVERY Day!”  just click HERE

Many “commonly used phrases” that allow us to describe our feelings
start with the phrases
“I hope…” or  “I wish…”

 If we are hopeful for someone else,  in Italian we must say
“I  hope that…” or  “I wish that…

which will lead us to the Italian subjunctive mood.
See below for how this works.

As we all master these phrases, so will you. Try my method and let me know how it works. What sentences will you create with these phrases?

Please reply. I’d love to hear from you! Or join our Conversational Italian! group discussion on Facebook.

The basics of the Italian language are introduced in the Conversational Italian for Travelers textbook and reference books Just the Verbs and Just the Grammar  

                       found on amazon.com and Learn Travel Italian.com.

The rights to purchase the Conversational Italian for Travelers books in PDF format on two electronic devices can also be obtained at Learn Travel Italian.com.

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What I Wish…

For the Italian Winter Holiday Season

When an Italian wants to describe a hope or a wish  he has, either for himself or someone else, he  must use the verb sperare, and this is the verb that will be the topic of our blog today.

Sperare works a bit differently from the “typical” Italian -are verb.  To review what we’ve learned in our last blog about sperare:

  • When using the verb sperare to express a hope or a wish one person or a group has for themselves, sperare must be followed by the preposition “di”.
  • “Di” will often be followed by a verb in the infinitive form (to see, to start, etc.), which will start the phrase that follows to describe the hope or wish.

Sperare + di + infinitive verb

So, “I hope…” or, “I wish…”  would be, ” Io spero di…” But, of course, we leave out the subject pronoun in Italian, so the phrase becomes,  “Spero di…”  “We hope… ” or, “We wish…”  would be, “Speriamo di…”

Or, one can just say, “Speriamo!”  for, “Let’s hope so!” or,  “Let’s wish!” in order to express a hope or wish that is shared  with someone else.

Below are listed important Italian holidays and some common phrases that Italians use to wish each other “happy holidays”.  We will learn how to use the verb sperare for our holiday wishes in the next section.

 

Vigilia di Natale Christmas Eve
Natale  Christmas
Buon Natale!
Buone Feste!
Merry Christmas!
Happy Holidays!
Auguri di buon Natale!  Best wishes for a merry Christmas!
Tanti Auguri!
Auguri!
Best wishes!
Le tradizioni Natalizi
Le luci Natalizie Il biglietto di auguri Natalizi
Regalo di Natale
“Spero di ricevere un buon regalo di Natale dal mio fidanzato quest’anno.”
Christmas traditions
Christmas lightsChristmas greeting card
Christmas gift
“I hope/wish to receive a wonderful Christmas gift from my boyfriend this year.”

 

L’ultimo dell’anno New Year’s Eve
La notte di San Silvestro December 31st is the feast day of San Silvestro for the Catholic church
Capodanno New Year’s Day
Buon anno nuovo!
Buon anno!
Happy New Year!  (used most often)
Felice anno nuovo!  Happy New Year!
Epifania

 

Catholic church holiday, which celebrates when “Wise Men” visited the baby Jesus.  In Italy, gifts are exchanged on this day.  Italian traditions: a friendly witch, La Befana, brings gifts to children, although Santa Claus is also celebrated.

 

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Now that we are familiar with Italian end-of-the-year holidays and  greetings, lets go on and see how sperare can help us to express our good wishes. A short review is necessary from our previous blog as a reminder that…

  • When one uses the verb sperare to express a hope or a wish he has for someone else or something else, he must follow the verb with the conjunction “che”, which means “that”. In fact, the word “che” can never be left out of an Italian sentence of this type and must be used to link the two phrases!
  •  “Che” will then be followed by a verb in the subjunctive mood, which will start the phrase that follows to describe this hope or wish.

Sperare + che + subjunctive present tense verb

Just what is the “subjunctive mood”?  The subjunctive mood is the type of verb form that Italians use to express a wide range of emotions, such as hopes and wishes.

In order to express our good wishes for the holidays, we must first review the commonly used present tense form of the subjunctive mood for the verb avere, which means “to have”.

Che is included in parentheses in the first column of our table below as a reminder that these verb forms are typically introduced with  the conjunction che.  Also,  make sure to include the subject pronoun in your sentence after che for clarity, since the singular verb forms are identical. The stressed syllables have been underlined for you.

Practice the subjunctive verbs out loud by saying che , the subject  pronoun and then the correct verb form that follows!

Avereto have – Present Subjunctive Mood

(che) io abbia I have
(che) tu abbia you have
(che) Lei (che) lei/lui abbia you have
she/he has
     
(che) noi abbiamo we have
(che) voi abbiate you all have
(che) loro abbiano they have

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Phrases of Good Wishes Using “Avere” in the Present Tense Subjunctive Mood

Example phraes that use avere (to have)  in the subjunctive mood to express good wishes are listed below.  Many of these phrases are a good way to end a conversation before departing a friend’s company.  These phrases are also commonly used to sign off emails to family and friends  in order to express hopes for a good week or weekend.

You will notice that for the phrases in the first column of the list below, the Italian verb passare, which refers to “passing time” or “spending time,” is used.   In English, the verb “to have” is used in these situations, so we must “think in Italian” in order to remember the proper Italian phrase!

Also, notice that the English translation is the same for the present tense and the Italian subjunctive forms used in the sentences below.

 

Present Tense
Phrase
Present Tense
Subjunctive Phrase
Passa una buona settimana! Have a good week! Spero… che tu abbia una buona settimana. I hope that you have a good week!
Passa un buon fine settimana! Have a good weekend! Spero… che tu abbia un buon fine settimana. I hope that you have a good weekend!
Buona giornata.

Buona serata.

Have a good day.

Have a good evening.

Spero… che tu abbia una buona giornata/buona serata. I hope that you have a good day/evening.

 

Finally, in the last table of examples, we will provide Italian phrases that can be used to express good wishes for the winter holidays! In later blogs, we will discuss the subjunctive endings for passare and fare.  For now, just remember the endings to use in these often-used phrases of good wishes for the holiday season!

Present Tense
Phrase
Present Tense
Subjunctive Phrase
Buon Natale!  Merry Christmas! Spero che tu passi
un buon Natale.
Spero che voi passiate
un buon Natale. 
I hope that you have a merry Christmas!

I hope that you all have a merry Christmas!

Buone feste!  Happy holidays! Spero che tu faccia  buone feste!

Spero che  voi  facciate  buone feste!

I hope that you have happy holidays!
I hope that your holidays are happy!I hope that you all have happy holidays!
I hope that your (to a group) holidays are happy!
Buon anno! Happy New Year! Spero che tu abbia
un buon anno!
Spero che voi abbiate
un buon anno!
I hope that you have a happy New Year.

I hope that you all have a happy New Year.

 

Remember these phrases and the Italian subjunctive mood, and I guarantee you will use them to bring good wishes to your family and friends for the holidays and every day!

Buone feste!

 

Learn Conversational Italian for Travelers
Conversational Italian for Travelers Textbook

   Available on amazon.com and Learn Travel Italian.com

Fra Noi Magazine – Read and become “a little bit” Italian today!

Conversational Italian in Fra Noi 2018
Kathryn Occhipinti, MD
Kathryn Occhipinti, MD, for Conversational Italian for Travelers books

Ciao a tutti!  Fra Noi Magazine, a gorgeous, glossy magazine, featuring Italian-Americans, is the subject of my blog today because…

This already wonderful magazine has just undergone a “make-over”, and the first  “new” edition has just come just out this week!

Fra Noi is the only magazine I receive that I actually wait for with great anticipation each month! It’s pages are filled with interesting interviews about the Italian-Americans who are making a difference in our world today and informative articles about the community here in Chicagoland and in our Italian homeland.

If you want to see for yourself, click on the link for the Fra Noi Magazine November 2018 issue  that Fra Noi has generously provided to promote their magazine this month.

Along with the timely Italian-American news Fra Noi provides, their reviews of music and movies keep me up-to-date, and their travel section features great travel tips and beautiful photographs of a different region and city each month.  I also love to turn to my favorite columnists: Zia Maria, who has a witty Italian saying for every situation, and Mary Ann Esposito,  whose recipes are perfect for the home cook, whether making dinner for her family or a for a special occasion.

I am also honored to report that…

I have been included in the Fra Noi Magazine’s expansion of  coverage for Italian language!  

Fra Noi magazine now features five pages written entirely in Italian!  Check out pages 93-97 in this month’s magazine. This is a wonderful opportunity for those learning Italian to increase their knowledge of the Italian spoken today, while at the same time reading timely and entertaining material about Italy.  The Italian articles feature Italian movies, Italian history,  Italian artists, and Italian sports.

On page 85 of  Fra Noi magazine, I am introduced as a website columnist for Fra Noi. Each month on the Fra Noi website – FraNoi.com Language Tab – I will provide a blog from my popular series, “Italian Phrases We Use EVERY Day!”

 

Take a look at the Fra Noi website, and you will find even more reasons to love this magazine!

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And remember Conversational Italian for Travelers: Just the Important Phrases on Amazon.com and Learn Travel Italian.com if you need a compact, lightweight pocket guidebook to take on your next trip to Italy! Free Cultural Notes, Italian Recipes, and Audio to help you practice your Italian are also found on Learn Travel Italian.com.

Just the Important Phrases from Conversational Italian for Travelers
Conversational Italian for Travelers “Just the Important Phrases” (with Restaurant Vocabulary and Idiomatic Expressions)

Italian Phrases We Use EVERY Day! Sperare (Part 1) – What I hope…

Burano in Venice, Italy and Everyday Italian phrases

 

Kathryn for learntravelitalian.com
Kathryn Occhipinti, MD, for Learn Travel Italian.com

Do you want to speak Italian more easily and confidently by the end of 2018? Well, it is now September and I hope my blogs have been helping you so far with your goal this year!

As I’ve said before, I believe that “commonly used phrases” are the key for how we can all build fluency in any language in a short time.

If we learn how to incorporate “commonly used phrases” when we speak Italian, we will be able to express important feelings – like our  hopes – just as we do in our native language!  This will help us with our “email Italian” as well.  Read below and you will see what I mean.

This post is the 15th in a series of Italian phrases we have been trying out in our Conversational Italian! Facebook group.  If you’d like to read the earlier posts in the series, “Italian Phrases We Use EVERY Day!”  just click HERE

Many “commonly used phrases” that allow us to describe our feelings
start with the phrase
 “I hope …”

 If we are hopeful for someone else,  in Italian we must say
“I hope that …

which will lead us to the Italian subjunctive mood.
See below for how this works.

As we all master these phrases, so will you. Try my method and let me know how it works. What sentences will you create with these phrases?

Please reply. I’d love to hear from you! Or join our Conversational Italian! group discussion on Facebook.

The basics of the Italian language are introduced in the Conversational Italian for Travelers textbook and reference books Just the Verbs and Just the Grammar  

                       found on amazon.com and Learn Travel Italian.com.

The rights to purchase the Conversational Italian for Travelers books in PDF format on two electronic devices can also be obtained at Learn Travel Italian.com.

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What I Hope…

In Italian Conversation and Email

When an Italian wants to describe a hope  he has, either for himself or someone else, he  must use the verb sperare, and this is the verb that will be the topic of our blog today.

Sperare works a bit differently from the “typical” Italian -are verb.

  • When using the verb sperare to express a hope one person or a group has for themselves, sperare must be followed by the preposition “di”.
  • “Di” will often be followed by a verb in the infinitive form (to see, to start, etc.), which will start the phrase that follows to describe this hope.

Sperare + di + infinitive verb

So, “I hope…” would be ” Io spero di…” But, of course, we leave out the subject pronoun in Italian, so the phrase becomes,  “Spero di…”  “We hope… ” would be, “Speriamo di…”


Or, one can just say, “Speriamo!”  for, “Let’s hope so!” in order to express a hope that is shared  with someone else.

Below are some every day phrases that use the verbs sperare to express a hope for something we would like to see happen.  Notice how the subject  is expressing the hope he or the group has for themselves with the sentence structure provided below.  You can add on additional qualifiers at the end of the sentence to describe “when” you hope something might occur.

There are, of course, many more things one can hope for during the course of an ordinary day! How many more can you think of?  

Spero di “si.” I hope so.
Speriamo! Let’s hope so.
Spero di … vederti di nuovo presto. I hope… to see you again soon.
Lei spera di… viaggiare a Roma d’estate.  She hopes… to travel to Rome
in the summer.
Speriamo di… iniziare il progetto domani.  We hope… to start the project tomorrow.
Spero di… andare a trovare* mia nonna quando ho un giorno libero. I hope… to visit my grandmother
when I have a day free.

*andare a trovare = to visit a person you know 
visitare= to visit a place

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You’ve probably already noticed that our example sentences for the verb sperare can become fairly long and express complex ideas. By connecting phrases we can learn build more meaningful sentences in Italian!  But we are not done yet!  Because…

  • When one uses the verb sperare to express a hope he has for someone else or something else, he must follow the verb with the conjunction “che” which means “that”. In fact, the word “che” can never be left out of an Italian sentence of this type and must be used to link the two phrases!
  •  “Che” will then be followed by a verb in the subjunctive mood, which will start the phrase that follows to describe this hope.

Sperare + che + subjunctive present tense verb

Just what is the “subjunctive mood”?  The subjunctive mood is the type of verb form that Italians use to express a wide range of emotions: hopes (as we have just seen), thoughts, beliefs, doubts, uncertainty, desire or a feeling.  There is a long list of phrases that trigger the subjunctive mood, and many of these phrases will be the subject of later blogs.

For now, let’s review the commonly used present tense form of the subjunctive mood for the verb stare, which means “to stay” but is used with the meaning of “to be” in situations regarding one’s health.

Che is included in parentheses in the first column of our table below as a reminder that these verb forms are typically introduced with  the conjunction che.  Also,  make sure to include the subject pronoun in your sentence after che for clarity, since the singular verb forms are identical.  The stressed syllables have been underlined for you.

Practice the subjunctive verbs out loud by saying che, the subject  pronoun and then the correct verb form that follows!

Stareto stay (to be) – Present Subjunctive Mood

(che) io stia I stay (am)
(che) tu stia you (familiar) stay (are)
(che) Lei(che) lei/lui stia you (polite) stay (are)
she/he stays (is)
     
(che) noi stiamo we stay (are)
(che) voi stiate you all stay (are)
(che) loro stiano they stay (are)

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Example Phrases Using “Stare” in the Present Tense Subjunctive Mood

Sentences using stare (to stay/to be) in the subjunctive mood come up very commonly in this modern life in conversation, and especially in email.  In this era of technology, it seems like not a day goes by without an email being sent and received. The old formalities of opening and closing a letter have returned!

After the greeting in an email, especially if there has not been recent communication, it is customary to mention a hope that all is well with friends and family. Here is a case for the subjunctive!

To follow are some examples when the Italian subjunctive mood in the present tense might be used in conversation during daily life.

Notice that the English translation is the same for the present tense and the Italian subjunctive forms used in the sentences below.

Present Tense
Phrase
Present Tense
Subjunctive Phrase
Tu stai bene. You (familiar) are well. Spero… che tu stia bene. I hope… that you (familiar) are well.
Lei sta bene. You (polite) are well.
She is well.
Spero… che Lei/lei stia
bene.
I hope… that you (polite) are well.
I hope that she is well.
Lui sta bene. He is well. Spero… che lui stia bene. I hope… that he is well.
La famiglia sta bene. The family is well. Spero… che la tua famiglia* stia bene. I hope… that the family* is well.
Tutti stanno bene. Everyone/body
is well.
Spero… che tutti stiano bene.  I hope… that everyone/everybody is well.

*Famiglia = family and is a collective noun and takes the third person singular.

Remember these phrases and the Italian subjunctive mood, and I guarantee you will use them every day!

 

Conversational Italian for Travelers: “Just the Verbs”

   Available on amazon.com and Learn Travel Italian.com